Oystercatcher update +

Further to my post last week regarding the ringed Oystercatcher I spotted at Mayflower Park I have had some feedback.

The bird was 1st ringed as an adult in January 2019 in Southampton Water all recordings have been in the local area and all in the winter sadly as yet no summer sighting. UK numbers of Oystercatchers increase in the winter when birds come south from Norway so this bird could be one of those wintering birds.

Many thanks for the sighting could you please send the photo as a jpg attachment so I can enlarge it to help work out the black/blue ring. However, I think it has to be the bird below with a black ring. It is a bird we ringed at Dibden Bay as an adult on 1st date below. All such sightings are most useful.

FP45007 N O+R//NB 25-Jan-19 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 15-Nov-19 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 09-Dec-19 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 09-Dec-19 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 22-Jan-20 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 22-Jan-20 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 13-Nov-20 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 13-Nov-20 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 13-Nov-20 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 11-Nov-21 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 11-Nov-21 Cracknore Hard, Marchwood, Southampton Water.
FP45007 S O+R//NB 15-Dec-21 Cracknore Hard, Marchwood, Southampton Water.
FP45007 S O+R//NB 30-Jan-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 23-Feb-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 06-Oct-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 06-Oct-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 06-Oct-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 03-Nov-22 Dibden Bay, Southampton Water, Hampshire, S England
FP45007 S O+R//NB 24-Nov-22 Mayflower Park, Southampton, Hampshire, S England

Some further bird spots.

Dunlin in non-breeding plumage.

Northern shoveler ducks.

Shelduck.

A town park.

A few hours in Mayflower Park Southampton this morning.

Mayflower Park is a waterfront park, in the old part of the City with views over the River Test. It is on reclaimed land near where the Mayflower left Southampton 400 years ago, Pilgrims embarked on their historic transatlantic voyage on August 15 1620. They were on two ships – the iconic Mayflower and the lesser-known Speedwell. The park is the only city centre waterside park with views across the River Test.

Feeding Gulls in the park.

There are always some shipping movements near the park.

An interesting lifeboat launch system on the bulk car transporter.

Herring Gulls, All different ages.

There were a few Oystercatchers on the grass of the park as the tide was high. One was ringed. So I sent off the details and I hope I will get some information on this bird. I will update my blog if I get any feedback.

Life passing the ditch.

Day and night wet or dry there is always someone crossing the ditch. Trail camera footage and stills from the film.

Roe Deer.

Lots of Robins pass the camera with their bright red breast you would think they would stand out but in the autumn leaves, they are quite camouflaged .

Deer and more.

A different area of the New Forest today gave a glimpse of both some Fallow Deer and some Red Deer. All females and youngsters.

Fallow Deer.

Red Deer.

Also, a few Redwing were about. The redwing is a common winter visitor and is the UK’s smallest true thrush. Its creamy strip above the eye and orange-red flank patches make it distinctive. Rare in summer with under 20 pairs but in the winter the influx of some 8.6 million birds!

Timber from the New Forest.

At the start of World War, One much of the timber required by the UK came from Canada. By 1916 Canadian timber could no longer be imported on a large enough scale to meet requirements for the war effort as there were not enough freight ships for all the country’s munitions, food and other essential items. Timber production from English forests and woodlands had to be increased to meet the Canadian shortfall. Labour was short due to the war. To harvest local timber the First Battalion of Lumbermen was formed of 1500 Canadian workers who started coming to the UK. The Canadians brought over their own equipment an initial advance party of 15 Canadians set up in a camp near Lyndhurst. which quickly grew and later received help from Portuguese labourers.

The camp was some 4 to 5 acres in size and surrounded by fences It was like a self-contained village with over 25 huts. Including workshops and even a hospital. At the height of the camp’s usage, there were around 100 Portuguese and 200 associated workers on site. There was also a Light railway that helped speed up timber production. Other camps were set up mainly in Southern England.

Little remains of the timber camp today as most of the buildings were wooden.

Concrete remains of the sawmill.

Now a monument “The Portuguese fireplace” is the chimney of the former cookhouse.

Timber Work in the New Forest is still being undertaken.